Posted by: Peadar Ban | September 4, 2010

Drizzlecane Earl

I do love the way Drudge and the other MSM dramatize things.  Three, no four, days ago Earl was a MONSTER, 20 points high across the top of my screen and all of the video outlets were screaming about its danger.

Well the “drizzlecane” has come and gone.  The soft breezes brought a fine mist of moisture, simply a lowering of the clouds that had gently gathered above us as morning progressed, hung around indecisively all day and finally have begun to slide off northeast-ward on such a quiet morning that the calls of Jays are about the only thing heard at 7:00am.  The leaves sleep peacefully on the ends of still branches, small drops of water slipping down only every once in a while.   As if they had expected more and got quite a bit less than that, even the Jays, ordinarily boisterous in the morning, sound quietly in the background, perhaps wondering what on earth happened — or didn’t happen

Normally the buzz of lawnmowers would be ripping the air apart by this time, and I would be grumbling about it who have long since retro-fitted myself with an old fashioned push mower.

This is a much nicer thing to grumble about, news-hype and quiet on a Saturday morning.  Somewhere out on the Atlantic ocean, on its way to Storm-Valhalla, Earl disappears into the coldness and the mist of memory.

I await the next tragic disaster the headlines will warn I cannot avoid but will not experience. May they all be as pleasant in their arrival, graceful during their stay and polite in their leave taking as has been Earl the Gentle Drizzelcane.

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Responses

  1. When did weather become news?

    • I suppose it became news when the “Suits” decided that it would sell; weather, fires, sports and chatter being about all that takes place, so I understand, on the 6 and 11 these days.

      Over on cable they alternate, so I understand again, between insulting each other’s networks and insulting the intelligence of their viewers with inane guests, inane questions for them and inane commentary on the guests or the topics they will discuss or have just done so.

      Live cartoons.

  2. […] say never where balrogs are concerned, I suppose.  The same might apply to “Drizzlecanes”, a name I applied to the recent passing storm named Earl, whose slipping by New England late Friday […]


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